Loading...
Home > Archive > Russell Page Archive: PepsiCo World Headquarters

Russell Page Archive: PepsiCo World Headquarters

This large-scale project at the world headquarters of PepsiCo Inc. was Page’s last major undertaking. From 1980 until his death in 1985, he made frequent visits to the site in Westchester County, 25 miles north of New York City, working largely on designs to harmonise the company’s substantial collection of outdoor sculptures with the landscaped parkland.

  • PepsiCo, Location Map of Outside Sculpture Collection

    RP/1/14/22/11

    July 1980

    61 x 91.5 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    A dyeline plan dated July 1980 (the date has been added in pencil), labelled 'PepsiCo Inc., World Headquarters, Purchase, New York, Location of outside sculpture collection'. Presumably produced by PepsiCo, the plan shows the layout of the site (with each piece of sculpture marked) at the time Page began working on the project.

  • PepsiCo, Sketch

    RP/1/14/22/12 (1 of 7)

    Undated

    39.1 x 27.4 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An ink and coloured pencil design on paper dated July 30. Although no year is given, it is possible that it was drawn up early in the project. The drawing shows roads (or pathways) leading off the number 4 office block; this road intersects with the new yellow pathway which Page introduced as a way for visitors on foot to navigate the grounds.

  • PepsiCo, Garden Sketch Plan, Stage 1

    RP/1/14/22/1

    October 1980

    86 x 94 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    A dyeline design with added coloured pencil dated October 1980 marked, 'Stage 1, PepsiCo, Sketch plan, scale 1 inch = 50 foot'. The drawing shows the right-hand section of the whole PepsiCo site (RP/1/14/22/2a shows the left). Page gives a fairly detailed idea of his intentions for the site through written annotations. Some plants are marked, although at times these are only suggestions.

  • PepsiCo, Garden Sketch Plan, Stage 2

    RP/1/14/22/2a

    October 1980

    93 x 102 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    A dyeline design with added coloured pencil dated October 1980 marked, 'Stage 2, PepsiCo, Sketch plan, scale 1 inch = 50 foot'. This drawing shows the left-hand section of the whole PepsiCo site (RP/1/14/22/1 shows the right). As with RP/1/14/22/1, Page has added several annotations, including suggestions for planting.

  • PepsiCo, Location and Measurements for Pathways

    RP/1/14/22/3

    May 1981

    58 x 92 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An ink and pencil design on tracing paper dated 15 May 1981 marked ‘drawn to scale 1" = 16'.’ The drawing shows Page’s design for a new garden with three waterlily pools. The gravel paths which surround the ponds (6’6” wide), the steps nearby, and some of the planted areas are indicated.

  • PepsiCo, Pools, Revised Plan

    RP/1/14/22/4

    June 1981

    51 x 92 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An ink and pencil design on tracing paper dated 12 June 1981 marked, 'Pools, Setting out, Revised, scale 1/8" - 1 foot'. Like RP/1/14/22/3, this plan shows Page’s design for the new small lily pond garden with pools. This plan, presumably a revision to RP/1/14/22/3, focuses mainly on the pools themselves, with dimensions.

  • PepsiCo, Sketch of Reception Area

    RP/1/14/22/12 (2 of 7)

    1 March 1982

    27.8 x 21.6 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An ink and coloured pencil design on paper dated 1 March 1982. The drawing shows an elevation of the back wall of the reception area in office building number 4. It includes mirrored panelling and a facetted column, built around an existing pier, with a planter at the base.

  • Pepsico, Sketch of Pavilion

    RP/1/14/22/12 (3 of 7)

    Undated

    43.2 x 28.9 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An undated pencil drawing of the pavilion with seating designed for the waterlily garden (see RP/1/14/22/3 and RP/1/14/22/4).

  • PepsiCo, Front Hall, Building 4

    RP/1/14/22/5

    July 1982

    71.5 x 93 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An ink and pencil design on tracing paper dated 5 July 1982 marked, ‘Rough sketch, Possible arrangement for Front Hall, Building 4, scale 1/2" = 1 foot'. This is a more formal drawing of the reception area in office building number 4 (see RP/1/14/22/12/2), showing both a plan and an elevation of the back wall. Suggestions for indoor planting areas, including a moveable jardinière, are indicated.

  • PepsiCo, Garden Sketch Plan

    RP/1/14/22/16

    October 1983

    46.2 x 61 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    A dyeline design dated Oct[ober] 1983 (the annotations are mirrored), drawn to a scale 1”=204'. Printed on PepsiCo paper, it shows a landscaped area off the main office complex.

  • PepsiCo, Horticulture Yard, Preliminary Sketch Plan

    RP/1/14/22/6

    June 1984

    50 x 56 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    A pencil design on tracing paper dated 8 June 1984 marked, 'PepsiCo, Preliminary sketch plan for Horticulture Yard, approx. scale 1/8" = 1 foot'. The plan gives details for overall layout of the various components of the horticulture yard, including a greenhouse, fences, hedges and what appear to be plant beds.

  • PepsiCo, Proposed Horticulture Yard, Preliminary Sketch Plan

    Ref: RP/1/14/22/7

    July 1984

    64 x 77.5 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An ink and pencil design on tracing paper dated July 1984 marked, 'PepsiCo, Preliminary sketch plan, Proposed Horticulture Yard for raising and storing plants, scale 1/8" = 1ft'. A slightly altered version of RP/1/14/22/6; the area given over for flowerbeds has been amended and enlarged.

  • PepsiCo, Location of Sculpture

    RP/1/14/22/8

    July 1984

    48 x 78 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    A pencil design on tracing paper dated July 1984 marked, 'Mr Erdman’s sculpture, scale 1/4" = 1 foot'. A suggested design for the surface on which to sit Richard’s sculpture ‘Passage’. A plan and a cross section show the proposed drainage system; an explanation of the design is given in handwritten notes in the bottom right-hand corner.

  • PepsiCo, Rose Garden and Lilac Alley Sketch Plan

    RP/1/14/22/9

    September 1984

    41 x 92 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    A pencil design on tracing paper dated September 1984 marked, 'Preliminary sketch plan for a rose garden and lilac alley south of new work yard, scale 1/8 inch = 1 foot'. The plan shows the layout of the beds, hedges and paths in the rose garden, and the twin rows of lilac trees in the area between the rose garden and the work yard.

  • PepsiCo, Location and Measurements for Pathways

    RP/1/14/22/14

    Undated

    30.8 x 36.2 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An undated pencil design on tracing paper of an unidentified small garden. What appear to be brick paths are shown (with dimensions). Crossed in the centre, these paths create a series of geometric flowerbeds.

  • PepsiCo, Location of Calder and Bear Sculptures

    RP/1/14/22/17

    Undated

    37.5 x 50 cm

    ©Estate of Russell Page

    An undated dyeline design for part of the site. The drawing shows a small section of the outer ring road, a grove, grass, the lake, and the new yellow pedestrian path. The locations (or proposed locations) of sculptures by Alexander Calder and, presumably, David Wynne’s ‘Grizzly Bear’ are marked.

Donald M. Kendall Sculpture Gardens, PepsiCo World Headquarters, Purchase, Harrison County, New York, USA

1980 to 1985

Archive of Garden Design Ref: RP/1/14/22

At PepsiCo’s headquarters in Purchase, New York, Russell Page ingeniously drew together the site’s extensive park area and the collection of 20th century sculptures placed within it. By introducing curving pathways, he not only allowed the visitor to connect with the art on view but created more of a balance between the natural and man-made elements of the site. Smaller gardens were added to the areas surrounding the modernist complex of offices. These had been designed by architect Edward Durrell when the land was acquired in the late 1960s, as seven symmetrical, connected buildings.

Page had been invited to work on the project by Donald Kendall, the force behind the gardens and after whom they are named. Kendall, chief executive officer of PepsiCo from 1971 to 1986, became friends with Page in Chile in the late 1970s, and later recalled:

‘I met Russell down in Chile, and we established a wonderful relationship there. I invited him up to our home and then showed him PepsiCo. He lived at our house for quite a while. It was a very personal thing between the two of us, and that’s why he devoted the last years of his life here. It wasn’t just the garden. Russell was so happy here, and everybody treated him so well. He was treated like a king because they all thought he was one.’ (Mortimer, [211])

Kendall saw the gardens as an outward manifestation of the company’s values: experimental yet stable. In 1966, PepsiCo had relocated its corporate headquarters to a former polo club in Purchase, Westchester County, New York, bringing with it the collection of sculptures the company had begun to acquire the previous year. Surrounding the newly-built offices, the site, well over 100 acres, was laid out as gardens. Around 6,000 trees were added to an outer ring which buffered the property from land outside. Edward Durrell Stone Jr. (son of the complex’s architect), who was charged with landscaping the grounds, incorporated the eight sculptures in the collection into the overall design.

By the early 1980s the number of sculptures had grown to 28 and the layout needed updating accordingly. In handwritten notes, Page summarised his initial thoughts:

‘The placing of several large pieces of sculpture has seriously affected the fluidity of the original composition. As things are the landscaping looks too bland and the sculpture too aggressive. The scales of the two elements are too disparate and the total visual effect may not be too bad as you drive past but looks deplorable if you are walking or stationary.[…] In the case of the Purchase Park, the lines and shapes of existing plantings have to be heavily strengthened and be made far more dramatic both in choice of trees and in their placing. The nature of the sculptures and their materials demands contrast in plant forms and textures and a careful study of light and shadow.’ (Page, n.p.)

In order to improve the experience for those walking around the grounds, Page’s first step was to introduce a pathway, made of amber-coloured gravel, which curved its way around the grounds, linking buildings, gardens and sculpture together to create a unified whole. His vision for the entire site can be gleaned from two large plans which, when viewed together, incorporate the whole property (RP/1/14/22/1 and RP/1/14/22/2). Unusually, among the early drawings are two for an interior of one of the office reception areas.

There are also designs for the new waterlily garden that Page created. Here, three geometric pools, sunk into grass, are surrounded by perennial borders. A classical pavilion at one end of the garden (see RP/1/14/22/12) is said to have been inspired by the eighteenth-century garden designer Humphry Repton (van Zuylen, 247).

Although several of the plans are more concerned with layouts than the specifics of planting, a handwritten list of ‘plants wanted’ survives; more than 45 varieties of roses are included (RP/1/14/22/12(4-7 of 7)).

Following Page’s death in January 1985, Francois Goffinet continued to work on the gardens (as he did at Badminton).

Literature

Mortimer, Senga. “The Garden Page.” Unidentified publication (Archive of Garden Design: RP/5/1/11).

Page, Russell. “PepsiCo Offices, Purchase NY’. Unpublished manuscript, undated [1980?] (Archive of Garden Design: RP/3/1/1A).

van Zuylen, Gabrielle and Marina Schinz. The Gardens of Russell Page. Frances Lincoln Ltd, 2008.

Related material in the Archive of Garden Design

RP/4/3/12: PepsiCo, Page working on the site during construction (photographs by Marina Schinz)
RP/4/3/13: PepsiCo, pond (photograph)
RP/4/3/14: PepsiCo, three ponds (photograph)
RP/4/3/35: PepsiCo, aerial view (photograph)

Related material elsewhere

There are mounted 35mm colour transparencies of the PepsiCo gardens in the RHS Lindley Library reference collection (PAG/2/3/11).